Girls' education in Afghanistan: Nazifa's story

Posted by Rebecca Wynn Media Coordinator for the Middle East, Europe and the Eastern Commonwealth of Independent States

24th Feb 2011

Getting girls back into school has been one of the rare Afghan success stories of the last 9 years. But the progress made is in danger of slipping away. Rebecca Wynn explains.

Like millions of Afghan girls, Nazifa was forced to drop out of school during Taliban rule. Now 20 years old she is in her final year of high school. Her education was stalled and denied to her, but she's trying to get the years she lost back.

Getting girls back into school has been one of the rare Afghan success stories of the last 9 years. Nazifa is not alone. There are now some 2.4 million Afghan girls enrolled in school, compared to just 5,000 in 2001. But although the numbers are impressive, the reality is that the gains made in girls' education are in danger of slipping away.

Oxfam surveyed 1600 girls, teachers and parents from across Afghanistan for our new report High Stakes and found that factors such as poverty and insecurity, as well as the state of the school system itself, are making it harder for girls to stay in school, and tougher for them to receive a good quality education when they are there.

It's not too late to make a difference. By supporting more teacher training for women and more female-only schools, we can keep Afghan girls in school, facing a blackboard and a better future.

High Stakes: read the report

Where we work - Afghanistan

Blog post written by Rebecca Wynn

Media Coordinator for the Middle East, Europe and the Eastern Commonwealth of Independent States

More by Rebecca Wynn