Media advisory: Afghanistan landslides

Posted by Ian Bray Senior Humanitarian Press Officer

3rd May 2014

In the wake of devastating landslides that have destroyed at least 300 homes, displaced more than 1,000 families and cost many lives in Afghanistan's Badakhshan province, Oxfam and local partners are responding to urgent lifesaving needs and assessing ways to rebuild affected communities.

"As the search and rescue operation continues, the immediate needs of over 1,000 families must urgently be met. While communications are proving difficult, we can expect providing clean water, food, and temporary shelter will be the most urgent priorities. Oxfam-together with our Afghan partners in the province-is readying a response," Oxfam's Afghanistan Country Director John Watt said.

 

"Beyond immediate humanitarian needs, the affected communities will need ongoing support to rebuild their lives and livelihoods in order to recover from this tragedy," Watt said.

In addition to the recent Badakhshan landslides, Oxfam is currently responding to flood-related emergencies in Afghanistan's Takhar and Samangan provinces.

For further enquiries or to arrange an interview with Oxfam's Afghanistan Country Director John Watt, please contact:

Roslyn Boatman
Oxfam Media Lead
+93 (0) 796 738 402roslyn.boatman@oxfamnovib.nl
Skype: roslyn.boatman

Background:

Oxfam first provided support to projects in Afghanistan in 1964, and has been directly providing humanitarian and development assistance in the country since 1991, including during Taliban rule. In the period 2010-2011, Oxfam helped 300,000 through its humanitarian, development and policy and advocacy work to help people address the challenges of everyday life: finding enough to eat, sending their children to school and coping with conflict and disasters. Oxfam works in seven provinces, directly through our staff in two provinces, and through our partners in the others. We aim to help people sustain good livelihoods, reduce the impact of crises and disasters, and empower women and girls socially and economically.

Blog post written by Ian Bray

Senior Humanitarian Press Officer

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