We urgently need funds to open up our life-changing swamp farming project to 700 of Liberia's poorest families. 

As well as helping them to grow enough rice to beat hunger, your support could help these farmers to grow extra to sell, too. And that means 5,000 local people would be able to buy food at an affordable price. Watch Susana's story to see what a difference you can make.

£25 can buy enough seeds to help five families boost their rice harvests

£35 can train five farmers to grow enough rice to feed their families

£113 can help irrigate a swamp farm so rice crops thrive in all conditions

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Susana's story

"It was the bush, with thorns and big, big trees. But when Oxfam came, see what we got? My beautiful rice." - Susana Edwards, Liberia.

Transforming marshland to abundant rice paddy

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The transformation of the swamp farms mean there’s at least twice as much rice for everyone.

After years of civil war, families in Liberia are living in extreme poverty. Rice is the staple food here but families don't have the resources to grow it for themselves and most can't afford to buy it either. For many people, every day is a struggle to feed their children. Oxfam's swamp farming project could change everything.

1  After clearing the swampland, all the waste needs to be removed or burned. It's a tough job in the blistering heat. 2 The land then needs to be ploughed. It's demanding work but with your help, Oxfam will provide more communities with labour-saving power tillers. 3 A small part of the land can now be set up as a nursery for high-yielding rice seedlings.
           
4 Irrigation channels are dug to enable farmers to control water. The old rice farms were reliant on steady rain fall and most of the rice plants used to burn in the sun. 5 With an effective water supply in place, the land then needs to be levelled using a rake or a hoe. It's now ready for planting. 6 Weeding is now essential, and takes up much of the farmers' time until harvest.

Photos: Kieran Doherty