Pakistan: Getting girls into school

Would you like to give girls in Pakistan the chance of a decent education?

 
 

Help give girls in Pakistan the chance of a decent education

Education is the key to a brighter future, and it's amazing how little it can cost to get children started on the road to learning.


Your donation can do something brilliant

It will go towards innovative community-wide schemes to encourage parents to send their daughters to school. And the results can have far-reaching effects even outside the classroom, as Rehana's and Uzma's families discovered.

Five-year-olds, Rehana Barohi and Uzma Kharani, are students of Sohbo Kariro GGNG primary school, Shahdadkot district, Sindh. They are members of rival ethnic groups, but are best friends at school. However, after attending community meetings about improving the school and discovering their daughters were school-friends, their fathers also became friends and decided to ignore the local disputes.

What your money can buy

£40 is enough to buy teacher learning materials such as books and equipment, for example calculators

£35 is enough to train one teacher in effective teaching methods and issues including gender sensitivity and child rights.

£30 is enough to provide a children's club with a kit full of useful learning materials.

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We plan to help improve the quality of teaching and facilities in 300 schools in eight flood-prone districts.

Photo: Oxfam

A bit of background

In Pakistan, more than seven million children don't go to school - and most of these are girls. Many parents don't see the benefits of educating girls, seeing early marriage as a higher priority. Or they feel that their daughters would be unsafe in school due to overcrowding, lack of facilities like toilets, or the poor condition of the buildings, which are easily destroyed by flooding.

This combination of traditional values and ongoing lack of government investment in schools and education, mean that twice as many girls as boys are unable to read and write.

How we're helping

With your support we'll be making 300 schools a better place for girls. There'll be new books and equipment. We'll retrain 650 teachers in more child-friendly techniques. Plus we'll support for school councils to press local government for improvements, and give thousands of children the skills and confidence to spread the word about the need for greater government support and a change people's attitudes to girls' education. We plan to spread this feel-good message across 300 schools in eight flood-prone districts by improving the quality of teaching and facilities, and to getting families and the authorities together to get girls a better deal.

By making schools more female-friendly and giving communities the means to campaign, we hope to see girls' enrolment rise by 15 per cent, and lay the foundations for girls' learning for generations to come.

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Look how far your money can go

However much you can afford, your donation will really change lives. Just ask the people we've already helped.

Raveena Brohi, is eight, and studies at Sohbo Kariro GGPS primary school in Shahdadkot, Sindh province.

 I used to be afraid of my teachers and used to keep on making plans to avoid coming to school.

But after Raveena's teachers were trained by Oxfam to use child-friendly teaching techniques, children have increased their understanding and now work together in groups. Her school has also been supplied with interactive teaching materials.

I am not scared of school anymore, as many good things have started happening recently. Our teachers' friendly behaviour with us in the classroom has actually made us feel good about ourselves. I look forward to coming to school every day. I want to go to college and become a teacher one day myself.

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