Campaigning success stories

Thanks to Oxfam supporters, we've been able to celebrate many campaign successes over the years. From big business to global organisations to the UK Government, people power has been inspiring positive change since 1942. Recently, the United Nations, Coca Cola and George Osborne have all taken action to lift lives for good following campaigns on the arms trade, land rights and tax justice.

Gallery: 2013 campaigns

Previous campaign successes

Free health care in Sierra Leone

In 2011 Sierra Leone celebrated its first year of free health care for mothers and children under five. And it all started with people like you. Your tireless campaigning helped persuade the UK government to help Sierra Leone and five other developing countries provide free care.

Haiti's debt dropped

More than 220,000 people died and more than 1 million people were left homeless by the devastating earthquake that hit Haiti on 12 January 2010. To help its recovery, the World Bank then waived Haiti's $36m debt, thanks in part to more than 415,000 people who signed the "Drop the Debt" petition.

Coal plant plans go up in smoke

In 2009, E.ON were planning a new coal-fired power station at Kingsnorth in Kent.  The energy company pulled the plug on the controversial carbon-heavy power station after you took action as part of the Stop Climate Chaos coalition, forming a human chain around the perimeter of their existing plant.

Making HIV treatment affordable

Oxfam supporters' determined campaigning paid off in 2009 when a patent pool for HIV drugs was agreed. That means manufacturers can produce affordable versions of the drugs: a major step towards the 33 million people living with HIV and AIDS getting the treatment they need.

Starbucks coffee: A fair price

Nearly 100,000 people contacted Starbucks in 2007 and asked them to pay Ethiopian farmers a fair price for their coffee beans. Under pressure, eventually Starbucks put people before profits - so we still get to drink great coffee, and the farmers get paid fairly for it.

Medicines for millions

In 2007, legal action by Novartis put the health of millions at risk. The pharmaceutical giant launched a battle to challenge India's right to produce cheap, generic version of medicines -- affordable drugs that poor people worldwide depend on. So 80,000 Oxfam campaigners stepped in to help put a stop to it - and got the result the world's poorest people needed!