Cookies on oxfam

We use cookies to ensure that you have the best experience on our website. If you continue browsing, we’ll assume that you are happy to receive all our cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more Close

  • Grows vegetables
  • Fills classrooms
  • Drills wells
  • Empowers women
  • Fights poverty

Smuggling on the South Coast

£14.99

Product description

A smuggler ...'honest thief ' or 'wretch'? Opinion was divided some two hundred years ago when smuggling was in its heyday and known as 'that infamous traffick'. Charles Lamb, the essayist, was in favour when he wrote in the early 1800s, 'I like a smuggler; he is the only honest thief.' The great lexicographer, Dr Johnson, begged to differ when he wrote this definition in his dictionary: 'A smuggler is a wretch who, in defiance of the laws, imports or exports without payment of the customs.' Most people would rather agree with Lamb, but the author shows that Johnson's definition is nearer the truth. The book traces the early history of open smuggling back to the illegal export of Britain's Golden Fleece - the so-called 'owling' of raw wool to the Continent. The violent heyday of the contraband trade came in the eighteenth century when heavy taxes on luxury items made their illegal importation highly profitable. The British love for these supposed luxuries of tea, tobacco and spirits is explained in fascinating detail. The second half of the book is devoted to the notorious Hawkhurst Gang, who held sway throughout Kent and Sussex and, having bought the contraband in the Channel Islands or the Low Countries, smuggled it ashore along the South Coast. To protect their infamous trafficking, the gang resorted to wholesale corruption, terrorism and murder, the latter invariably a result of heavy drinking. Their enormous crimes are described in detail, as are the trials which finally broke up the gang in 1749. Smuggling on the South Coast is the result of five years' research in which the author has traced the history of an era which was brought to a violent and bloody conclusion in the 1830s. It dispels many misconceptions that the reader may have about the subject and provides a new insight into an intriguing period of our history. Some usage soiling on the fore edge.

Item details

Added value:
Fine condition, scarce
Author(s):
McCooey, Christopher
Condition:
Used: very good
Edition:
2012
Format:
Paperback
ISBN-10:
1445604590
ISBN-13:
9781445604596
Number of pages:
192
Publisher:
Amberley

Standard UK Delivery £3.95 per order

Delivery FAQs

Free returns

within 21 days.
Returns policy

About this item

A smuggler ...'honest thief ' or 'wretch'? Opinion was divided some two hundred years ago when smuggling was in its heyday and known as 'that infamous traffick'. Charles Lamb, the essayist, was in favour when he wrote in the early 1800s, 'I like a smuggler; he is the only honest thief.' The great lexicographer, Dr Johnson, begged to differ when he wrote this definition in his dictionary: 'A smuggler is a wretch who, in defiance of the laws, imports or exports without payment of the customs.' Most people would rather agree with Lamb, but the author shows that Johnson's definition is nearer the truth. The book traces the early history of open smuggling back to the illegal export of Britain's Golden Fleece - the so-called 'owling' of raw wool to the Continent. The violent heyday of the contraband trade came in the eighteenth century when heavy taxes on luxury items made their illegal importation highly profitable. The British love for these supposed luxuries of tea, tobacco and spirits is explained in fascinating detail. The second half of the book is devoted to the notorious Hawkhurst Gang, who held sway throughout Kent and Sussex and, having bought the contraband in the Channel Islands or the Low Countries, smuggled it ashore along the South Coast. To protect their infamous trafficking, the gang resorted to wholesale corruption, terrorism and murder, the latter invariably a result of heavy drinking. Their enormous crimes are described in detail, as are the trials which finally broke up the gang in 1749. Smuggling on the South Coast is the result of five years' research in which the author has traced the history of an era which was brought to a violent and bloody conclusion in the 1830s. It dispels many misconceptions that the reader may have about the subject and provides a new insight into an intriguing period of our history. Some usage soiling on the fore edge.

Added value:
Fine condition, scarce
Author(s):
McCooey, Christopher
Condition:
Used: very good
Edition:
2012
Format:
Paperback
ISBN-10:
1445604590
ISBN-13:
9781445604596
Number of pages:
192
Publisher:
Amberley

Delivery & returns

This item will be dispatched to UK addresses via second class post within 2 working days of receipt of your order. Standard UK delivery is £3.95 per order, so you're only charged once no matter how many items you have in your basket. Any additional courier charges will be applied at checkout as they vary depending on delivery address.

You can find out more about delivery and returns in our help section.

We offer a no quibble returns policy as follows:

Wedding dresses: 14 days

Overseas returns: 31 days

Everything else: 21 days


This item is also available for international delivery by airmail, carrying a mandatory delivery charge of:

Europe: £4.70

Outside Europe: £7.00

Volunteer listed

Wonder how this unique item ended up online?

Most of the second-hand items you see online have been donated, by supporters like you, to our high street stores. Each item is then priced, photographed and listed on this site by our amazing team of volunteers from across the country.

After you have bought your item, our team of volunteers package and dispatch it from the Shop straight to you or your chosen recipient.

All profits from the sales of our goods go towards funding Oxfam's work around the world. We rely on your donations to sell online so please keep the cycle of goodness going!

To find out more about volunteering with Oxfam, please visit our how to volunteer page.

Oxfam Bookshop Lymington

Lymington is on the South coast, bordering on the New Forest National Park which was created as a Royal Forest in 1079 by William the Conqueror, and first recorded as 'Nova Foresta' in the Doomsday Book in 1086. Our Oxfam Shop at 73, The High Street is in a lovely Georgian building, the tallest in Lymington. The elegant Georgian buildings lining the wide main street were built mostly for merchants in the local salt trade. The famous Saturday market brings the town to life with its variety of stalls. The area is renowned for outdoor pursuits, including camping, sailing, windsurfing, and surfing, as well as forest walks and horse riding.

View Shop