Cookies on oxfam

We use cookies to ensure that you have the best experience on our website. If you continue browsing, we’ll assume that you are happy to receive all our cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more Accept

  • Grows vegetables
  • Fills classrooms
  • Drills wells
  • Empowers women
  • Fights poverty
  • Free Uk delivery on all gifts
    Or you can add a donation at checkout
  • Personalise your gift at checkout
    Add a personal message, ecard or card front
  • Add a 'Little Extra' at checkout
    Add-on gifts available (including chocolate!)

Heat Considered as a Mode of Motion

£60.00

Product description

This volume contains a collection of lectures by John Tyndall, one of the most eminent scientists of the 19th century, in which he introduced and explained new theories and possibilities about heat - its origins, behaviour, and potential use as a source of power to generate motion. For example, prior to Tyndall it was widely surmised that the Earth's atmosphere has a greenhouse effect, but he was the first to prove it, by discovering that water vapour strongly absorbed infrared radiation.

John Tyndall FRS (1820–1893) was a prominent Anglo-Irish 19th-century physicist. Trained initially in mathematics and surveying, he travelled to Germany to study physics under such eminent names as Bunsen, returning to London in 1851, and being elected Fellow of the Royal Society in 1852. His initial scientific fame arose from his study of diamagnetism. Later he made discoveries in the realms of infrared radiation and the physical properties of air. Tyndall also published a number of science books presenting state-of-the-art 19th century experimental physics to a wide audience. From 1853 to 1887 he was Professor of Physics at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London.

Our copy of this title is in good condition for its age, bound in red cloth which is considerably faded, particularly on the spine, but with only minor signs of shelf wear (bumped corners and some wear to top & bottom of spine). An embossed border enlivens both boards, and the title etc are in surprisingly bright gilt on the spine. The back cover is slightly bent at the centre of the long edge, and there is a slight tearing of the cloth binding at the top L/H side of the spine. Inside, the brown endpapers are in good condition, with some cracking along the spine at the front angle. An Ex Libris in the name of John Waern Hill is pasted inside the front cover, and a binder's stamp (Westley's) inside the back. An ink-written name at the top of the title page is possibly contemporaneous with the date of publication. The binding is firm, with no loose sheets, and there is only light foxing to one or two pages, the fold-out illustration, and the long edges of the text block. Copiously illustrated, this is a nice copy of an important early scientific text.

Item details

Added value:
Presumed 1st edition
Author(s):
Tyndall, J.
Condition:
Used: good
Dimensions:
20 x 13.5 x 3.5 cm
Edition:
1863
Format:
Hardback
Number of pages:
452
Publisher:
Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, & Green
Title:
Heat Considered as a Mode of Motion

Standard UK Delivery (currently free)

Delivery FAQs

Ts & Cs
Delivery FAQs

Free returns

within 21 days.
Returns policy

About this item

This volume contains a collection of lectures by John Tyndall, one of the most eminent scientists of the 19th century, in which he introduced and explained new theories and possibilities about heat - its origins, behaviour, and potential use as a source of power to generate motion. For example, prior to Tyndall it was widely surmised that the Earth's atmosphere has a greenhouse effect, but he was the first to prove it, by discovering that water vapour strongly absorbed infrared radiation.

John Tyndall FRS (1820–1893) was a prominent Anglo-Irish 19th-century physicist. Trained initially in mathematics and surveying, he travelled to Germany to study physics under such eminent names as Bunsen, returning to London in 1851, and being elected Fellow of the Royal Society in 1852. His initial scientific fame arose from his study of diamagnetism. Later he made discoveries in the realms of infrared radiation and the physical properties of air. Tyndall also published a number of science books presenting state-of-the-art 19th century experimental physics to a wide audience. From 1853 to 1887 he was Professor of Physics at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London.

Our copy of this title is in good condition for its age, bound in red cloth which is considerably faded, particularly on the spine, but with only minor signs of shelf wear (bumped corners and some wear to top & bottom of spine). An embossed border enlivens both boards, and the title etc are in surprisingly bright gilt on the spine. The back cover is slightly bent at the centre of the long edge, and there is a slight tearing of the cloth binding at the top L/H side of the spine. Inside, the brown endpapers are in good condition, with some cracking along the spine at the front angle. An Ex Libris in the name of John Waern Hill is pasted inside the front cover, and a binder's stamp (Westley's) inside the back. An ink-written name at the top of the title page is possibly contemporaneous with the date of publication. The binding is firm, with no loose sheets, and there is only light foxing to one or two pages, the fold-out illustration, and the long edges of the text block. Copiously illustrated, this is a nice copy of an important early scientific text.

Added value:
Presumed 1st edition
Author(s):
Tyndall, J.
Condition:
Used: good
Dimensions:
20 x 13.5 x 3.5 cm
Edition:
1863
Format:
Hardback
Number of pages:
452
Publisher:
Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, & Green
Title:
Heat Considered as a Mode of Motion

Delivery & returns

This item will be dispatched to UK addresses via second class post within 2 working days of receipt of your order. Standard UK delivery is £3.95 per order, so you're only charged once no matter how many items you have in your basket. Any additional courier charges will be applied at checkout as they vary depending on delivery address.

This item will be dispatched to UK addresses via second class post within 2 working days of receipt of your order. Standard UK delivery is currently free, no matter how many items you have in your basket. Any additional courier charges will be applied at checkout as they vary depending on delivery address.

You can find out more about delivery and returns in our help section.

We offer a no quibble returns policy as follows:

Wedding dresses: 14 days

Overseas returns: 31 days

Everything else: 21 days


This item is also available for international delivery by airmail, carrying a mandatory delivery charge of:

Europe: £14.00

Outside Europe: £28.00

Volunteer listed

Wonder how this unique item ended up online?

Most of the second-hand items you see online have been donated, by supporters like you, to our high street stores. Each item is then priced, photographed and listed on this site by our amazing team of volunteers from across the country.

After you have bought your item, our team of volunteers package and dispatch it from the Shop straight to you or your chosen recipient.

All profits from the sales of our goods go towards funding Oxfam's work around the world. We rely on your donations to sell online so please keep the cycle of goodness going!

To find out more about volunteering with Oxfam, please visit our how to volunteer page.

Oxfam Books and Music Islington

Oxfam is the UK's largest second hand bookseller. This store sell a very wide variety of books and music across 2 floors. We specialise in literature, history and fine art books as well as offering fiction, academic, leisure, travel, religions and children's books.

We also offer a well curated selection of DVDS, CDs & vinyl and have a dedicated classical music section. All our stock is donated.

View Shop