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Pesebres De Trapo De Popayan (Popayan Rag Mangers)

£28.99

Product description

Please note: The text of this book is in Spanish.

Los primeros “belenes” o “nacimientos” del Niño Dios que trajeron los conquistadores españoles al mundo americano llegaron a Quito y Popayán, donde se asentaron las familias ilustradas, católicas y pudientes de la época. La palabra “pesebre” es nueva, y conocida ya en el mundo como un colombianismo que ha ganado terreno en el vocabulario español.

Los pesebres que llegaron eran de porcelana italiana y española. Al principio, eran la representación de la Sagrada Familia, luego se le añadió los tres reyes magos. Dicen que la necesidad pone a funcionar la imaginación, y de la imaginación pueden salir milagros. Fue así como algunas mujeres de Palmira y Popayán, comenzaron a confeccionar muñecos para el pesebre hechos con retazos que dejaban sastres y costureras, y que se vendían a bajo precio para familias de clase popular. Pero que hoy en día, cuando se valora el trabajo artesanal, esos pesebres de trapo tienen su precio, y no son fáciles de conseguir.

Eran muñecos hechos con telas sobrantes, medias de seda rasgadas o viejas, pedazos de alambre, restos de hilo, y rostros pintados con tizones y achiote, que pronto se pusieron de moda. Primero en Popayán y luego en todo el sur del continente. Muñecos que hoy son joyas familiares, para exhibición de coleccionistas que deben cuidar mucho, pues la tela es efímera a diferencia de la porcelana, la arcilla o el vidrio.

The first "cribs" or "births" of the Child God that the Spanish conquerors brought to the American world arrived in Quito and Popayán, where the enlightened, catholic and wealthy families of the time settled. The word "manger" is new, and already known in the world as a Colombianism that has gained ground in the Spanish vocabulary.

The cribs that arrived were made of Italian and Spanish porcelain. At first, they were the representation of the Holy Family, then the three wise men were added. They say that necessity puts the imagination to work, and miracles can come from the imagination. This is how some women from Palmira and Popayán started to make dolls for the manger made from scraps that left tailors and seamstresses, and that were sold at low prices for families of the popular class. But nowadays, when craftsmanship is valued, those rag cribs have their price, and they are not easy to obtain.

They were dolls made with leftover fabrics, torn or old silk stockings, pieces of wire, remnants of thread, and faces painted with smudges and achiote, which soon became fashionable. First in Popayán and then in all the south of the continent. Dolls that today are family jewels, for exhibition of collectors that must take care of a lot, because the fabric is ephemeral unlike porcelain, clay or glass.

Unpaginated, but approximately 50 pages, including several foldouts. Numerous beautiful full colour photographs of the cloth Nativity (and other) figures, most in traditional Colombian costume, made by artist Emérita Malo

This book has an illustrated dust jacket which shows some signs of shelf wear and has a few small tears along the bottom edge. Internally, the pages are clean and the binding is tight.

A beautiful item.

Item details

Author(s):
Paredes Pardo, Jaime
Condition:
Used: very good
Dimensions:
9.25" by 10"
Edition:
1977
Format:
Hardback
Number of pages:
50
Title:
Pesebres De Trapo De Popayan (Popayan Rag Mangers)

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About this item

Please note: The text of this book is in Spanish.

Los primeros “belenes” o “nacimientos” del Niño Dios que trajeron los conquistadores españoles al mundo americano llegaron a Quito y Popayán, donde se asentaron las familias ilustradas, católicas y pudientes de la época. La palabra “pesebre” es nueva, y conocida ya en el mundo como un colombianismo que ha ganado terreno en el vocabulario español.

Los pesebres que llegaron eran de porcelana italiana y española. Al principio, eran la representación de la Sagrada Familia, luego se le añadió los tres reyes magos. Dicen que la necesidad pone a funcionar la imaginación, y de la imaginación pueden salir milagros. Fue así como algunas mujeres de Palmira y Popayán, comenzaron a confeccionar muñecos para el pesebre hechos con retazos que dejaban sastres y costureras, y que se vendían a bajo precio para familias de clase popular. Pero que hoy en día, cuando se valora el trabajo artesanal, esos pesebres de trapo tienen su precio, y no son fáciles de conseguir.

Eran muñecos hechos con telas sobrantes, medias de seda rasgadas o viejas, pedazos de alambre, restos de hilo, y rostros pintados con tizones y achiote, que pronto se pusieron de moda. Primero en Popayán y luego en todo el sur del continente. Muñecos que hoy son joyas familiares, para exhibición de coleccionistas que deben cuidar mucho, pues la tela es efímera a diferencia de la porcelana, la arcilla o el vidrio.

The first "cribs" or "births" of the Child God that the Spanish conquerors brought to the American world arrived in Quito and Popayán, where the enlightened, catholic and wealthy families of the time settled. The word "manger" is new, and already known in the world as a Colombianism that has gained ground in the Spanish vocabulary.

The cribs that arrived were made of Italian and Spanish porcelain. At first, they were the representation of the Holy Family, then the three wise men were added. They say that necessity puts the imagination to work, and miracles can come from the imagination. This is how some women from Palmira and Popayán started to make dolls for the manger made from scraps that left tailors and seamstresses, and that were sold at low prices for families of the popular class. But nowadays, when craftsmanship is valued, those rag cribs have their price, and they are not easy to obtain.

They were dolls made with leftover fabrics, torn or old silk stockings, pieces of wire, remnants of thread, and faces painted with smudges and achiote, which soon became fashionable. First in Popayán and then in all the south of the continent. Dolls that today are family jewels, for exhibition of collectors that must take care of a lot, because the fabric is ephemeral unlike porcelain, clay or glass.

Unpaginated, but approximately 50 pages, including several foldouts. Numerous beautiful full colour photographs of the cloth Nativity (and other) figures, most in traditional Colombian costume, made by artist Emérita Malo

This book has an illustrated dust jacket which shows some signs of shelf wear and has a few small tears along the bottom edge. Internally, the pages are clean and the binding is tight.

A beautiful item.

Author(s):
Paredes Pardo, Jaime
Condition:
Used: very good
Dimensions:
9.25" by 10"
Edition:
1977
Format:
Hardback
Number of pages:
50
Title:
Pesebres De Trapo De Popayan (Popayan Rag Mangers)

Delivery & returns

This item will be dispatched to UK addresses via second class post within 2 working days of receipt of your order. Standard UK delivery is £3.95 per order, so you're only charged once no matter how many items you have in your basket. Any additional courier charges will be applied at checkout as they vary depending on delivery address.

This item will be dispatched to UK addresses via second class post within 2 working days of receipt of your order. Standard UK delivery is currently free, no matter how many items you have in your basket. Any additional courier charges will be applied at checkout as they vary depending on delivery address.

You can find out more about delivery and returns in our help section.

We offer a no quibble returns policy as follows:

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This item is also available for international delivery by airmail, carrying a mandatory delivery charge of:

Europe: £6.50

Outside Europe: £11.50

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