Pakistan floods


Millions of people have been affected by flooding for the third year running in Pakistan's Sindh province.

Oxfam has helped 70,000 people worst affected by renewed flooding.

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Three years of flooding

In 2010 Pakistan was hit by its worst natural disaster - floodwater inundated up to one fifth of the country and affected an estimated 20 million people. Oxfam launched an immediate response to provide aid to more than 2.4 million people.

In 2012 fresh flooding in Pakistan's southern Sindh province put millions of people at renewed risk of disease and widespread malnutrition. 

Oxfam has helped 70,000 people worst affected by renewed flooding.

Report: Pakistan 2012 monsoon floods - a prolonged disaster

Oxfam's response

Oxfam launched an emergency response in Sindh province to provide support to those worst affected by the renewed flooding. So far we have helped 70,000 people worst affected by renewed flooding in Sindh.

Our response has included the provision of clean water and sanitation facilities and distributions of hygiene, kitchen and tool kits as well as animal fodder. We have also been running hygiene promotion sessions to help prevent the spread of disease.

Learn more about Oxfam's response to the 2010 Pakistan floods
Video: Building emergency latrines in Pakistan

Video: Building emergency latrines in Pakistan

A country unprepared

At the one year anniversary of 2010's devastating floods, Oxfam called on the Government of Pakistan to do more to protect its people from disasters like these. For example, river embankments in Sindh province have reportedly been increased by only 2-3 feet after the 2010 floods, rather than the recommended 6 feet.

We're asking the Pakistan Government and international donors to invest more in measures to reduce the impact of disasters, such as flood-resistant housing and effective early warning systems.

Read the report - Ready or Not: Pakistan's resilience to disasters one year on from the floods

Briefing Paper: Pakistan floods emergency - Lessons from a continuing disaster

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