Why I’m Walking To Glasgow To Call For Climate Justice

My motivation comes from understanding and witnessing the direct impact of climate change in many communities across the world'”

Push Krishnamurthy

I am Pushpanath Krishnamurthy, I am affectionately called Push across the world. I am a regular guy with irregular hair.

I am so moved by the heart-wrenching impact of climate change across the globe, where women are hit first, worst and hardest. So this October, I will be walking from London to Glasgow, ahead of COP26 - the crucial UN climate summit. I will be calling for climate justice. For those who have contributed least to the climate crisis.

My walk

I will be starting my walk from the Mahatma Gandhi statue in Parliament Square, London, on 2 October. And aiming to arrive in Glasgow on 2 November.

I will be visiting communities and Oxfam shops along my route.

You can follow my progress on Facebook and Twitter. Meet me. Talk with me. Share your story.

Uma Pushpanath

Push walks

"To train, I walk at least 8-10 kilometres very fast every day."

Why I'm walking

I worked for Oxfam for more than 30 years across the world. And witnessed the direct impact of the climate crisis on communities, particularly on women.

In 2009, I was inspired to walk from the UK to Copenhagen – for the COP15 climate summit – 595km!

Originally, I was just thinking I would be walking and would hopefully meet a few people. But I could not believe how much of an impact it had, with many others deciding to take action themselves.

Why I walk fast

Since then, I have undertaken many walks as an independent activist for climate justice and fair trade. This will be the fourth COP I have walked to. I am, as always, inspired by Mahatma Gandhi and his call to “be the change you want to see in the world”.

I’m proud to have travelled and worked across the world – for a working child from Bangalore to have come this far, and to continue to enable, empower and mentor young people across the world.

This is a time when we have experienced climate impact at our doors in the UK and Europe. It is a defining decade and a binding, ambitious and fair treaty must be signed. This is not the time for a photo opportunity for leaders, it is a time to act and show urgency. That is why I walk fast.

I am a pensioner with a small income but with great determination to undertake this as I feel an overwhelming support from the grass roots.”

Push Krishnamurthy

Climate justice

The poorest women are paying with their lives and shattered livelihoods - I have witnessed this first-hand and they deserve justice.

My walk route is already being supported by hosts and climate justice activists. I am so encouraged and determined that the goodwill of people including Oxfam supporters and shops will lift me up and carry me though I am much older now.

Uma Pushpanath

Push trains for his big walk

'It is a time to act and show urgency. That is why I walk fast.'

How I train and what motivates me

To train, I walk at least 8-10 kilometres very fast every day. To improve strength, stamina, and speed. I have practised over 1000 kilometres in the last three months.

My motivation comes from understanding and witnessing the direct impact of climate change in many communities across the world. Specifically Africa and Asia.

I get many messages of support.

My family, my local community here in Britain, and my friends in Africa and India believe in me. And support me by walking along as I do here. And cheering me with songs and messages.

I am a pensioner with a small income but with great determination to undertake this, as I feel an overwhelming support from the grassroots.

I’d love to meet you all and hear your stories if I’m passing through your town.

If you’re inspired by my walk, why not pledge your own short walk for climate justice, and join the World Climate March.